Martin's Must-Reads

There are one million new books published each year.  With so many books and so little time, where do you begin to find your next must-read? There’s the New York Times Bestseller list, the Goodreads app, the Cape Library’s Staff picks shelf and now Martin’s Must-Reads.

Every Wednesday at 6:42 and 8:42 a.m., and now Sunday at 8:18 a.m., Betty Martin recommends a must read based on her own personal biases for historical fiction, quirky characters and overall well-turned phrases. Her list includes WWII novels, biographies of trailblazers, novels with truly unique individuals and lots more. Reading close to 100 titles a year, Betty has plenty of titles to share. Tune in each Wednesday and visit KRCU.org for previous must-reads. 

“There is something so tantalizing about having a gifted child that some parents will go to almost any lengths to prove they have one.”

I’m Betty Martin with "Martin’s Must Reads" and that’s a quote that Bruce Holsinger uses to begin his novel The Gifted School. Four women, Samantha, Lauren, Rose and Azra have been close friends for eleven years, ever since they met at a swim class when their children were babies.

“Are leaders born or made? Where does ambition come from?  How does adversity affect growth of leadership?  Do the times make the leader or does the leader shape the times?...What is the difference between power, title, and leadership?”

I’m Mark Martin with "Martin’s Must Reads."  These are some of the questions that Doris Kearns Goodwin explores in her book Leadership in Turbulent Times.

“And I could only have seen her there on the stone bridge, a dancer wreathed in ghostly blue, because that was the way they would have taken her back when I was young..., they would have bound her and brought her across this one, because this was the bridge that fed into the turnpike that twisted its way through the green hills and down the valley before bending in one direction,and that direction was south.”

“She has watched while a parade of young women, raising fists and rifles, marched past the bus taking her to Bahir Dar. They stared at her an aging woman in her long drab dress, as if they did not know those who came before them. As if this were the first time a woman carried a gun.”

“Some of us find remarkable echoes of our own modern lives in the historical past, as if we have inherited gifts or skills or preferences. Most families are like my family: with the earliest documents showing a family as humble and poor and, by little ordinary acts of courage and years of perseverance, largely unrecorded, rising and prospering - and sometimes, of course, declining.”

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