Dicamba Goes On Trial: The History Behind Monsanto’s Friendship-Wilting Weed Killer

Five years ago, the owner of Missouri’s largest peach farm started noticing damage to his orchard. A year later, Bader Farms estimated a loss of more than 30,000 trees. A lawsuit filed by the farm in 2016 alleges Monsanto, now owned by Bayer, and herbicide maker BASF Corp. are to blame because the weed killer drifted from other fields. Both companies deny the allegations. That suit, which seeks $21 million in damages, will be heard in federal court starting Monday in Cape Girardeau. It will be the first of several dicamba-related suits against the corporations to go to trial.

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Better Business Bureau

Consumer Handbook: Finding A Reliable Gym Or Fitness Provider

Are you determined to take control of your fitness in the new year? In 2019, consumers filed more than 4,000 complaints last year against fitness centers and health clubs. Many of those complaints claimed that centers refused to provide refunds to consumers who moved or were dissatisfied with the club’s programs or hours. Better Business Bureau has advice to help you evaluate gyms or fitness clubs and find a reliable business. Determine your fitness goals. It’s hard work to lose weight, and...

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In 2005, journalist Laurence Rees described the inner workings of the Nazi death camp in his book, Auschwitz: A New History, and Elie Wiesel spoke in 1988 about his experience at Auschwitz.

Nowadays, if you're a teenager who's good at video games there's a lot more to be had than just a pot of virtual gold.

There's college scholarships, tournament money and high salary jobs.

Today, more than 170 colleges and universities participate. And there's money on the table — more than $16 million in college scholarships. Naturally, high schools have followed suit.

This year, 17 states and the District of Columbia are offering formal esports teams.

Updated at 12:22 p.m. ET

A second person in the United States has been infected with a dangerous new coronavirus that is spreading in China, U.S. health officials announced Friday.

A woman in her 60s got infected with the virus while traveling in the Wuhan, China, area in late December and became ill after returning home to Chicago Jan. 13, according to officials from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Illinois and Chicago health departments.

Updated at 2:09 p.m. ET

A massive industrial explosion in northwest Houston early Friday killed two people, left a business in ruins, knocked homes off their foundations and sent debris flying for about half a mile.

The predawn blast at a building belonging to Watson Grinding and Manufacturing, which provides industrial services such as thermal spray coatings, could be felt more than 30 miles away, Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo said at a news conference.

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

Just hours before President Trump addressed thousands of anti-abortion rights activists at the annual March for Life in Washington, D.C., his administration has given its attendees reason to cheer.

The 50th Davos gathering ended on Friday. It's the annual meeting that critics love to hate. They say the World Economic Forum's event is just a forum for the rich and powerful to feel as if they're making a difference. And that their wheeling and dealing does not include input from the rest of world.

So does the conference actually do any good?

Doctors fear that the only drug approved to prevent preterm birth, the nation's leading cause of infant mortality and disability, will no longer be available to expectant mothers.

The drug, whose brand-name version is Makena, has been in limbo since October, when an expert panel convened by the Food and Drug Administration reviewed the accumulated evidence and concluded that Makena is not effective in preventing preterm birth.

In a close vote, the panel recommended the FDA withdraw approval and pull the drug off the market.

Don't say she didn't warn you!

Back when Megan Thee Stallion graced the Tiny Desk Fest in the fall of 2019, she gave fans a hint about what — or who — her new music would sound like.

"My next project I will be introducing a new lady. Her name is Suga. She's besties with Tina Snow," Megan said in an exclusive post-show interview.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services began awarding the 192 state medical marijuana dispensary licenses on Thursday. 

According to the constitutional amendment that voters approved in 2018, the department was required to license at least 192 dispensaries, 24 in each of Missouri’s eight congressional districts. This means DHSS could have awarded more licenses, but officials want to see if the minimum number can meet demand. 

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White Lies

Next month, KRCU will air a seven-part investigative podcast from NPR's Investigations Team which tells the story of one of the most significant unsolved murders of the Civil Rights era.

Missouri Higher Education Series

How are Missouri's public universities and colleges faring after losing millions in state funding? Explore this issue through a five-part series each Wednesday during Morning Edition on KRCU.

NPR Arts, Life, And Music

'Just Mercy' Attorney Asks U.S. To Reckon With Its Racist Past And Present

The third Monday in January is a U.S. federal holiday honoring the late civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., but two Southern states — Alabama and Mississippi — also use the day to celebrate Gen. Robert E. Lee, commander of the Confederate forces during the Civil War. Public interest lawyer Bryan Stevenson lives in Alabama and is the founder of the Equal Justice Initiative , which works to combat injustice in the U.S. legal system. The new movie, Just Mercy , is an adaptation of his...

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