Whitney Quick

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Cape Girardeau native Whitney Quick is the Regional Director of Better Business Bureau in Cape Girardeau, MO, and is responsible for outreach efforts in Southeast Missouri and Southern Illinois. Quick is a graduate of Cape Girardeau Central High School and Southeast Missouri University where she majored in public relations. Quick enjoys helping educate consumers in the southeast Missouri region by sharing consumer tips with groups and educating them about BBB’s resources.

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Better Business Bureau

Wildfires are back in the news on the West Coast. They’re destroying homes and businesses in California, where many residents are still rebuilding from past fires while dealing with the stress and anxiety of COVID-19. 

Better Business Bureau

Wildfires are back in the news on the West Coast. They’re destroying homes and businesses in California, where many residents are still rebuilding from past fires while dealing with the stress and anxiety of COVID-19. 

Better Business Bureau

Better Business Bureau warns consumers to beware of unsolicited or unexpected communications asking consumers to provide personal information, download an attachment, or send money. Many of these communications are often from impostors masquerading as trustworthy businesses and organizations. 

They may be “phishing” for Social Security numbers, passwords, credit card information, or other personal details for use in identity theft. They also may allege the consumer owes money for a delinquent account. 

Better Business Bureau

It's nearly back-to-school time, and many online shops are offering installment payment services that target high school and college-age buyers. These “buy now/pay later” services are new and quickly gaining in popularity. They allow shoppers to purchase just about anything - from electronics to a pair of shoes - by agreeing to pay a series of smaller installments. 

Daniel Grothe/Flickr, License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode

One of the most common scams in the U.S. today involves callers pretending to be government officials. Some claim to be tax officials and representatives from the Social Security Administration; others claim to be law enforcement officers and threaten legal consequences. All of them use fear and intimidation to trick victims into turning over personal information or money, often in the form of gift cards or prepaid debit cards. 

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