Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs

Host, To Your Health

Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs is an instructor and the director of health communication for Southeast Missouri State University’s Department of Communication Studies and Modern Languages. She writes for special publications of The Southeast Missourian and is a certified Community Health Worker. 

Ways to Connect

In his 1963 Thanksgiving proclamation, President John F. Kennedy said, “As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.”

Research shows that gratitude should be something we cultivate all year long rather than a quality we only celebrate on the fourth Thursday of November. To get into that habit, this month, “To Your Health” will focus each week on something to be thankful for.

Flickr User Personal Creations (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that 40 million kids aged 5 to 14 will be keeping up the tradition of knocking on doors this Halloween. Urban legends about poisoned candy or razor blades stuck in taffy apples have made parents vigilant through the decades; however, no recorded incident of a random Halloween poisoning or razor blade incident exists.  The biggest threat to trick or treaters , according to the American College of Emergency Physicians, is actually cars. Children are four times more likely to be hit by a car on Halloween night than on any other night of the year.

Flickr user Steve Labinski (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/)

How common is the common cold? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in the course of a year, people in the U.S. suffer 1 billion colds. But, when you’re coughing, sneezing, and miserable do you need a doctor?

Sometimes people are unsure if they have the flu, bronchitis, pneumonia...or just the common cold. To avoid an unnecessary trip to your healthcare provider and to prevent the overprescription of antibiotics, it helps to understand the difference between these illnesses.

stoptheclot.org

The American Society of Hematology states, “Blood clotting, or coagulation, is an important process that prevents excessive bleeding when a blood vessel is injured. Platelets and proteins in your plasma work together to stop the bleeding by forming a clot over the injury. Typically, your body will naturally dissolve the blood clot after the injury has healed. Sometimes, however, clots form on the inside of vessels without an obvious injury or do not dissolve naturally. These situations can be dangerous and require accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

flickr user anokarina (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/)

Artist Flash Rosenberg once commented, “I believe humans get a lot done, not because we're smart, but because we have thumbs so we can make coffee.”

There is still a lot of debate over the positives and negatives of coffee and other sources of caffeine, but research is showing that in moderation, caffeine consumption can be a good thing.

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