To Your Health

With some questionable health advice being posted by your friends on Facebook, politicians arguing about the state of the American healthcare system and a new medical study being summarized in just a sentence or two on TV---that seems to contradict the study you heard summarized  yesterday---it can be overwhelming to navigate the ever changing landscape of health news.

Every Thursday at 7:42 a.m. and 5:18 p.m., Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs provides health information you can trust. With trustworthy sources, she explores the fact and fiction surrounding various medical conditions and treatments, makes you aware of upcoming screenings, gives you prevention strategies and more…all to your health.
 

flickr user Alisha Vollkommer https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

At Christmastime, Jack Frost nipping at your nose sounds cute. When you are shoveling snow in January, you worry about meeting his ugly cousin, frostbite.

While hypothermia, the lowering of core body temperature, is deadly, frostbite---freezing of the skin and underlying tissues--- can cause permanent tissue damage,  as well as lead to amputation and disability. The Mayo Clinic reports there are three stages of frostbite.

National Eye Institute / National Institutes of Health

According to the National Eye Health Education Program, glaucoma is a leading cause of vision loss and blindness in the United States. People are often unaware that glaucoma has no symptoms in its early stages. If detected early, before noticeable vision loss occurs, glaucoma can usually be controlled and severe vision loss can often be prevented. Vision that is lost from glaucoma cannot be restored.

January is Glaucoma Awareness Month.

Stores are swapping the shelves full of cookie-making supplies with displays for weight-loss products. It reflects our state of mind…regretting the holiday indulgences, we want to quickly get back on the right track for the new year.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/ztec/8434316756/in/photolist-dRj5wq-5Pdxse-2mBRwd-VYRo5X-Xg61Ae-WFa4q3-WH97R1-6F5CH7-deVudw-4g5ZE1-b2hXCi-favicA-a8p3S6-2DEUQ-a9MmXR-aEjZC-85gtD5-ajypVf-9Hkcfk-57n7Av-8LnRm6-6hvwmD-WK6EHw-4eyVcA-9HkcLP-giHxV-bvtDzM-7j9UEA-eyJ / Loïc

Watching the ball drop in Times Square, singing “Old Lang Syne” and toasting with champagne are traditional ways of celebrating the new year. However, for some, the holiday provides what seems like a socially acceptable reason to overindulge in alcohol.

Pexels

Jokes about arthritis abound. “Who needs a weather report when you have arthritis?” Arthritis is very common, but not very well understood. According to the Arthritis Foundation, it isn’t even one disease, but an informal way of referring to joint pain.

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