Jason Rosenbaum

Since entering the world of professional journalism in 2006, Jason Rosenbaum dove head first into the world of politics, policy and even rock and roll music. A graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, Rosenbaum spent more than four years in the Missouri State Capitol writing for the Columbia Daily Tribune, Missouri Lawyers Media and the St. Louis Beacon. Since moving to St. Louis in 2010, Rosenbaum's work appeared in Missouri Lawyers Media, the St. Louis Business Journal and the Riverfront Times' music section. He also served on staff at the St. Louis Beacon as a politics reporter. Rosenbaum lives in Richmond Heights with with his wife Lauren Todd, an engineering librarian at Washington University. They have two sons, Brandon Todd Rosenbaum and Declan Todd Rosenbaum.

Have you ever wanted to have barbecue in Kansas City or gaze at the Columns in Columbia — but didn’t have time to make the drive to those two cities from St. Louis? 

Missouri officials want to solve your dilemma by investing in a tube rapid transportation system that could travel from St. Louis to Kansas City in roughly 30 minutes.

Missouri’s low-income housing tax credit is a complicated program that often gets debated in terms of dollars and cents, but for Mary Harris, the incentive that creates housing for the poor, elderly and disabled isn’t some philosophical concept.

Harris lives in a townhouse in Pine Lawn. Thanks to a tax credit to developers, she pays significantly less money in rent than for other places she’s lived throughout the St. Louis area. It’s an arrangement that’s had a profound impact on her life.

Publish Date: 2013-05-17 12:49:47
Authors: Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum and Jason Rosenbaum
Position: Beacon political reporter and
During final hours of session, Missouri Senate kills tax credit, transportation tax proposals

Hours before adjournment for the year, a state Senate filibuster appears to have killed a tax credit package that had won approval from the House just a couple hours earlier.

The package had been assembled by House and Senate conferees late Thursday and approved by leaders in both chambers.

As a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt is in the eye of the political storm over President Donald Trump.

The Missouri Republican is part of a committee that’s gathering facts about Trump’s July phone call with Ukraine’s president. He told reporters on Wednesday in St. Louis that “putting the facts together on the most recent House allegation is important — and then reaching conclusions.”

Members of the Missouri and Illinois congressional delegations are reacting to the escalating threat of impeachment against President Donald Trump along party lines.

At issue is Trump’s request for Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden, which was confirmed in a memorandum that the White House released on Wednesday. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced on Tuesday that the Democratic-controlled chamber would launch an impeachment inquiry. 

Trump has denied any impropriety. 

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