Almost Yesterday

Almost Yesterday is a glimpse into the rich history of our region. Dr. Frank Nickell takes listeners on a journey to specific moments in time, such as the first radio broadcast on KFVS, the history of Farmington’s CarlstonCollege, and the short-lived safari on a Mississippi River island. A gifted storyteller and local historian, Dr. Nickell’s wit and love for the past are combined with sounds and music that augment his narrative.

William Moses Gould Helms, 1902-1953
Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like almost yesterday that one of the great legends of Southeast Missouri was born. On the afternoon of August 14, 1902, William Helms, a farmer near Hopewell, Missouri stopped to water his horse in a stream under a railroad trestle near Irondale. As he turned to leave he heard the muffled cry of a child. To his great surprise he found the sound coming from a suitcase that was on the river’s bank at the water’s edge. Inside the suitcase he found a baby boy with an extra set of clothes and a spool of black thread.

Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that Hollywood came to Southeast Missouri. A production company headed by prominent director Roger Corman came to Charleston and East Prairie in 1961 to produce a movie based upon Charles Beaumont’s novel about race relations and school integration in the American South.

Sue Walker

It seems like almost yesterday that George Frederick Bollinger led a contingent of North Carolinians across the Mississippi River into Missouri.  The young Mr. Bollinger had visited the small community of Cape Girardeau in 1797, established a friendship with Louis Lorimier who encouraged him to return to North Carolina and bring more settlers to the area.

Southeast Missouri State University / KRCU

It seems like Almost Yesterday when Professor A. C. Magill stated on February 19, 1955, that colleges are not buildings, classrooms, nor even libraries.  Colleges, in his view, consisted of people:  teachers, students and staff.

 

It seems like almost yesterday that Denver Wright sought to bring a bit of Africa to the veldt of Southeast Missouri. The owner of a specialty company in St. Louis and a member of the Brentwood Board of Education, Wright inherited two lions from a small circus that simply ran out of money.

Challenged by the expense and difficulty of maintaining two grown lions, unable to give them away, Wright came upon the idea of releasing them and then hunting them in a real live safari.

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