Almost Yesterday

Almost Yesterday is a glimpse into the rich history of our region. Dr. Frank Nickell takes listeners on a journey to specific moments in time, such as the first radio broadcast on KFVS, the history of Farmington’s CarlstonCollege, and the short-lived safari on a Mississippi River island. A gifted storyteller and local historian, Dr. Nickell’s wit and love for the past are combined with sounds and music that augment his narrative.

It seems like Almost Yesterday that the Ohio and lower Mississippi Rivers experienced a severe flood. And, this 1937 flood occurred in January and February in the midst of cold, snow and ice.

From Pittsburgh to Cincinnati, Louisville, Paducah and Cairo the rivers reached record levels.  Desperate calls went out for volunteers to help sand bag.

Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that the circus came to De Soto, Missouri. In the days before television, color movies, and modern entertainment options, a high light for every community was when “the circus” came to town.

The Basketball Sensations of the 1950s / Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that the Puxico, Missouri basketball team achieved state and national recognition. Their story is told in Matt Chaney’s 1994 publication, My Name is Mr. Ryan, and it is a remarkable story.

The 1950s was a decade of significant change in high school basketball. This is the decade of small school triumphs that became the basis of legendary and magical stories still told by sports fans across the nation who remember the great teams from Milan, Indiana; Cuba, Kentucky; and Hebron, Illinois

Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like almost yesterday that Claude Miller accepted the final passenger toll paid to cross the Mississippi River bridge at Cape Girardeau. The bridge was to become free at 5:30 a.m.on June 29, 1957. At 5:29 a.m. Jerry Burchet of McClure, Illinois, reached out of the window of his pie truck and handed his fee to Mr. Miller so that he could cross the bridge into Illinois.

Warren Hearnes was the first Missouri governor elected to two consecutive terms. He brought significant changes to civil rights, education, mental health, the environment, and highway programs
Southeast Missouri State University / KRCU

It seems like Almost Yesterday that Warren Eastman Hearnes became governor of Missouri. Born in Moline, Illinois, on July 24, 1923, Hearnes grew up in Charleston, Missouri, the county seat of Mississippi County, a place he called home for the remainder of his life.

While in high school he determined that he wanted to attend West Point in pursuit of a military career. The desired appointment was received and he graduated from the academy in the class of 1946. In 1947, Hearnes married his high school sweetheart, Betty Cooper, a minister’s daughter.

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