Candice Davis

Former Host - Discover Nature

Candice Davis is the former host of Discover Nature on KRCU. Her goal is to help people to discover nature and learn to appreciate the many outdoor opportunities Missouri has to offer. Candice knows that people who spend time in the outdoors are generally less stressed, more thankful, healthier and more successful in life. Children who spend time outdoors have better grades and are more physically active. It’s Candice’s goal to inspire Missourians to discover nature in their everyday lives through stories of butterflies, elk, tupelo trees, alligator gar and other marvels of nature on KRCU’s Discover Nature program.

Missouri Department of Conservation

November 6 - 12  

Discover Nature this week and the value of a rodent.

Though some folks scream and climb the highest point possible when they see a rodent,  there isn't a reason to avoid native rodent species according to the Missouri Department of Conservation.

The term "rodent" may raise images of disease-infested vermin living in garbage-strewn alleys. Actually, most of the negative images arise from two unwelcome imports -- the house mouse and the Norway rat. These old-world immigrants are not typical of native rodents, though. 

Missouri Department of Conservation / KRCU

Take an early morning hike in the late autumn air this week and Discover Nature in Missouri’s most fleeting flower - that isn’t really a flower at all.

Frost flowers are delicate white blossoms that occur during the first hard frosts each fall when moisture squeezes through cracks in the stem and freezes into frosty Wribbons, rosebuds or other artistic looking shapes.

Missouri Department of Conservation. / KRCU

This week we can Discover Nature through conflict management.

Fox and Gray squirrels are among the most commonly observed Missouri animals. Because they populate as many towns and cities as they do forests, conflicts occur year-round when humans and squirrels live in close proximity. This time of year, squirrels look for a warm place to avoid the cold weather, and unfortunately they’ll often choose an accessible attic as their favorite shelter.

Missouri Department of Conservation

October 25 - October 31

Discover Nature this week as Snow goose populations peak at Missouri’s wetland areas.

Snow geese travel through Missouri during their migration from the subarctic and arctic tundra breeding grounds to the coastal marshes, bays and southern wet grasslands where they spend the winter months. These medium sized, gleaming white geese make a great subjects for nature photography. Though most snow geese are white, they do have other color phases, too.

Missouri Department of Conservation / KRCU

October 18 - October 24

Discover Nature this week as bald cypress and tupelo gum trees add their colors to Missouri’s fall landscape.

Both the bald cypress and the tupelo are romantic trees, often associated with dark, mysterious swamps.

The tupelo has full, graceful foliage, with oval shaped leaves that have a few randomly placed teeth.

Though the Bald Cypress is known as an "evergreen" tree, it isn’t really. Like the hardwoods, its needles turn yellow in the fall and are shed.

Pages