Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk. In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent, and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress, and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Journalism Award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

Updated April 8, 2021 at 4:00 PM ET

Declaring U.S gun violence an "epidemic" and "an international embarrassment," President Biden outlined actions to regulate certain firearms and to try to prevent gun violence after a spate of mass shootings in recent weeks and pressure from advocates.

"This is an epidemic for God's sake, and it has to stop," Biden said.

Updated April 8, 2021 at 9:57 AM ET

President Biden on Thursday will announce initial steps his administration plans to take on firearm safety, along with the nomination of a prominent gun safety advocate to lead the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

The moves, which were previewed Wednesday evening by a senior administration official, come after recent high-profile mass shootings put added pressure on Biden to act on gun violence.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, is the agency we think of responding to natural disasters like hurricanes and earthquakes. But in recent weeks it's also been helping to administer COVID-19 vaccinations in several states, as well as assisting at the border.

White House press secretary Jen Psaki said last month FEMA was helping the Department of Health and Human Services place unaccompanied minors in shelters and with families. "They're playing a number of roles there to address what we feel is a significant problem and a significant challenge."

Vice President Harris urged the Senate to approve two House-passed gun control measures in the wake of mass shootings in Boulder, Colo., and Atlanta, downplaying the role of executive action and saying changes needed to be made permanent through legislation.

"Enough with the partisanship, enough with the ideological perspective on this. Let's just be practical and agree," Harris said in an interview on CBS This Morning.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Pages