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Health & Science
With some questionable health advice being posted by your friends on Facebook, politicians arguing about the state of the American healthcare system and a new medical study being summarized in just a sentence or two on TV---that seems to contradict the study you heard summarized yesterday---it can be overwhelming to navigate the ever changing landscape of health news.Every Thursday at 5:42 a.m., 7:42 a.m. and 5:18 p.m., Dr. Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs provides health information you can trust. With trustworthy sources, she explores the fact and fiction surrounding various medical conditions and treatments, makes you aware of upcoming screenings, gives you prevention strategies and more…all to your health.Local support for To Your Health comes from Fresh Healthy Cafe in Cape Girardeau -- located inside St. Francis Medical Center. Online ordering is at freshsaintfrancis.com

To Your Health: HPV Prevention is Cancer Prevention

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The Kaiser Family Foundation shared that since the HPV vaccine was first introduced, there has been a significant decline in the prevalence of four HPV strains. Compared to the years prior to the vaccine being introduced, there has been an 88% decline in the prevalence of HPV among young women ages 14–19. Yet in Missouri, only about 54% of adolescents are fully vaccinated against HPV.

Hello, I'm Dr. Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs at Southeast Missouri State University. In February, the Missouri Immunization Coalition is focused on HPV Vaccination and HPV-related cancer prevention.. I recently interviewed Dr. Kenneth Haller, a pediatrician and an associate professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Saint Louis University School of Medicine, to ask his advice for people hesitant to have their child vaccinated against HPV.

One of the miracles of modern medical science has been the introduction of many vaccines that prevent life threatening illness. HPV is a virus that causes cancer. This has been demonstrated equivocally. And when a person has the HPV vaccine, women in particular, their chances of getting cervical cancer drops by about 90%. So this vaccine saves lives. It really is important that everyone gets their HPV vaccine on schedule.
Dr. Kenneth Haller

Resources:

https://www.kff.org/womens-health-policy/fact-sheet/the-hpv-vaccine-access-and-use-in-the-u-s/#:~:text=The%20FDA%20first%20approved%20first,was%20approved%20by%20the%20FDA.

https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/acip-recs/vacc-specific/hpv.html

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