Celebrate Independence Day Weekend With KRCU On Friday, July 3

Jul 2, 2020

Morning Edition: Declaration Of Independence
As we head into Independence Day Weekend, NPR’s Morning Edition will continue a decades old tradition: the reading of the Declaration of Independence. Hear Morning Edition on KRCU from 5-9 a.m. 

1A: Red, White, And The Blues
“The Blues are the roots. The rest is the fruits.” The Blues grew out of the Black experience in the American south. Out of The Blues grew Jazz, R&B, Rock and Roll, Rap – virtually every manner of modern music. This special, music-driven hour of 1A will spotlight Blues recordings selected by the Library of Congress to preserve for all-time in the National Recording Registry.  These recordings have been chosen for their historic, aesthetic or cultural importance to American society. The show will celebrate America’s birthday with music from John Lee Hooker, Howlin’ Wolf, Memphis Minnie, Jimi Hendrix, and others. Interviews include BB King, Angela Davis, Dan Aykroyd, Maria Muldaur, Vernon Reid, and many more. 1A can be heard on KRCU from 9-11 a.m.

To Honor And Inspire: U.S. Military Bands Special 
Andrea Blain will host this new special from American Public Media, featuring performances by the United States Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine bands. Audiences will be moved and uplifted by an hour of music, including marches by Sousa, Jewell and Gould, and classical works by Copland, Saint-Saens, and Holst. To Honor And Inspire will run in place of KRCU’s first hour of Caffe Concerto at 11 a.m.

Fourth Of July With The Tabernacle Choir At Temple Square 
Join Minnesota Public Radio’s Julie Amacher for an hour of traditional, patriotic choral music performed by the world-renowned Tabernacle Choir and Orchestra at Temple Square. This show from American Public Media will run in place of KRCU’s second hour of Caffe Concerto at 12 p.m. 

All Things Considered: Frederick Douglass Reading
As the country prepares to celebrate July 4 amid nationwide protests and calls for systemic reforms, this short documentary asks descendants of Frederick Douglass to read and respond to excerpts of his famous speech, "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?" The film encourages audiences to consider America’s long history of denying equal rights to Black Americans. Excerpts from the film will be featured during NPR’s All Things Considered, which can be heard on KRCU from 4-6 p.m.