To Your Health

With some questionable health advice being posted by your friends on Facebook, politicians arguing about the state of the American healthcare system and a new medical study being summarized in just a sentence or two on TV---that seems to contradict the study you heard summarized  yesterday---it can be overwhelming to navigate the ever changing landscape of health news.

Every Thursday at 7:42 a.m. and 5:18 p.m., Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs provides health information you can trust. With trustworthy sources, she explores the fact and fiction surrounding various medical conditions and treatments, makes you aware of upcoming screenings, gives you prevention strategies and more…all to your health.

Local support for this program comes from Dr. Greg Pursley, Board Certified Chiropractic Physician, with PC Wellness Centers in Cape Girardeau.

The Encyclopedia of Global Health states, “While it is impossible to avoid all illnesses, there are many forms of preventive care that reduce health risks by improving individual health.”

What preventive care do you need to have this year? It depends on your age as well as your risk factors.

Madison Inouye

Author Brianna Weist recently wrote, “True self-care is not salt baths and chocolate cake, it is making the choice to build a life you don’t need to regularly escape from.”

Self-care CAN be salt baths and chocolate cake, but it is not just the now oft-touted reason for indulging yourself. True self-care involves some components that are not necessarily hedonistic.

flickr user Alisha Vollkommer https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

At Christmastime, Jack Frost nipping at your nose sounds cute. When you are shoveling snow in January, you worry about meeting his ugly cousin, frostbite.

While hypothermia, the lowering of core body temperature, is deadly, frostbite---freezing of the skin and underlying tissues--- can cause permanent tissue damage,  as well as lead to amputation and disability. The Mayo Clinic reports there are three stages of frostbite.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/ztec/8434316756/in/photolist-dRj5wq-5Pdxse-2mBRwd-VYRo5X-Xg61Ae-WFa4q3-WH97R1-6F5CH7-deVudw-4g5ZE1-b2hXCi-favicA-a8p3S6-2DEUQ-a9MmXR-aEjZC-85gtD5-ajypVf-9Hkcfk-57n7Av-8LnRm6-6hvwmD-WK6EHw-4eyVcA-9HkcLP-giHxV-bvtDzM-7j9UEA-eyJ / Loïc

Watching the ball drop in Times Square, singing “Old Lang Syne” and toasting with champagne are traditional ways of celebrating the new year. However, for some, the holiday provides what seems like a socially acceptable reason to overindulge in alcohol.

flickr Gene Hahn (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/)

When we first think of holiday conflict, we may picture Black Friday shoppers duking it out over big screen TVs; however, the holidays can be fraught with many potential conflicts with family.

In the interest of your mental and social well being, here are some suggestions for avoiding the big three conflicts: money, politics, and personal life.

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