Martin's Must-Reads

There are one million new books published each year.  With so many books and so little time, where do you begin to find your next must-read? There’s the New York Times Bestseller list, the Goodreads app, the Cape Library’s Staff picks shelf and now Martin’s Must-Reads.

Every Wednesday at 6:42 and 8:42 a.m., and now Sunday at 8:18 a.m., Betty Martin recommends a must read based on her own personal biases for historical fiction, quirky characters and overall well-turned phrases. Her list includes WWII novels, biographies of trailblazers, novels with truly unique individuals and lots more. Reading close to 100 titles a year, Betty has plenty of titles to share. Tune in each Wednesday and visit KRCU.org for previous must-reads. 

The Keeper of Lost Things by Ruth Hogan

Anthony Peardew has been collecting lost things for forty years, ever since he lost the St. Teresa medal that his wife-to-be gave him right before she died. Every day he goes for a walk, picks up lost items, brings them back to his study, and labels them.

“They were at it again. Arguing, Shouting. Soon there would be crying. Weather like this brought out the darkness in her father.”

I’m Betty Martin with "Martin’s Must Reads" and that was a quote from Kristin Hannah’s novel The Great Alone.

The story takes place over twelve years beginning in 1974.  When husband and father, Ernt returns from Vietnam he struggles to keep a job. With a bequest of land in a remote village in Alaska, he decides to take his family there for a fresh start.

Martin's Must-Reads: 'Don't Make Me Pull Over!'

Jan 8, 2019

The summer I was 10, my father rented a sleep-in trailer to tow behind our station wagon and took our family of 6 from Dedham, Massachusetts to Yellowstone National Park. We spent a month taking the road trip of a lifetime.

Richard Raytay’s book “Don’t Make Me Pull Over!: An Informal History of the Family Road Trip” is a great read for any of you listeners who had a similar childhood. It is a mix of memoir, history lesson and travelogue.

Review of The Alice Network by Kate Quinn

May 1947, Southampton.  “The first person I met in England was a hallucination.”

I’m Betty Martin with "Martin’s Must-Reads" and those are the first lines in one of my latest favorite historical novels. The Alice Network by Kate Quinn has parallel narratives. One of Charlie,  a young unwed pregnant woman who, on her way to Switzerland to take care of what her mother calls her “little problem,” detours to follow leads to the whereabouts of her lost cousin.

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