Martin's Must-Reads

There are one million new books published each year.  With so many books and so little time, where do you begin to find your next must-read? There’s the New York Times Bestseller list, the Goodreads app, the Cape Library’s Staff picks shelf and now Martin’s Must-Reads.

Every Wednesday at 6:42 and 8:42 a.m., and now Sunday at 8:18 a.m., Betty Martin recommends a must read based on her own personal biases for historical fiction, quirky characters and overall well-turned phrases. Her list includes WWII novels, biographies of trailblazers, novels with truly unique individuals and lots more. Reading close to 100 titles a year, Betty has plenty of titles to share. Tune in each Wednesday and visit KRCU.org for previous must-reads. 

“Holding her first grandchild in her arms in 2003, Mary Robinson was struck by the uncertainty of the world he had been born into. Before his fiftieth birthday, he would have to share the planet with more than nine billion people - people battling for food, water, and shelter in an increasing volatile climate. The faceless, shadowy menace of climate change had become, in an instant, deeply personal."

“My phone doesn’t ring often - and it makes me jump when it does - and it’s usually people asking if I’ve mis-sold Payment Protection Insurance. I whisper “I know where you live” to them and hang up the phone very, very gently. No one’s been in my flat this year apart from service professionals; I’ve not voluntarily invited another human being across my threshold, except to read the meter. You’d think that would be impossible, wouldn’t you? It’s true though. I do exist, don’t I?”

“At twenty-eight years old, Scott Harrison had it all. As a top nightclub promoter in New York City, his life was an endless cycle of drugs, booze, models - repeat. But ten years in, desperately unhappy and morally bankrupt, he asked himself, ‘What would the exact opposite of my life look like?'”

“The Bluthner carried the memory of every note it had ever created. Every chord, every scale.  It had absorbed all the grief and longing and joy and exultation expressed through it’s action, the impression of every touch and every tear shed at its keyboard.”

I’m Betty Martin with "Martin’s Must Reads" and that’s a quote from Chris Cander’s book The Weight of a Piano.

During the first seventeen years of my library career as a children’s librarian, one of my favorite genres was fantasy and even now I am  drawn to adult fiction that draws from fairytale themes.

I’m Betty Martin with "Martin’s Must Reads" and today’s recommended read is Spinning Silver by Naomi Novik. It has a Rumpelstilskin flavor to it. It’s about two kingdoms in medieval times, one of this world, another of a world of ice and snow. And it’s about two women: Miryem, who helps her money lending family survive and Irina, who’s Duke father marries her off to the Tsar.

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