Martin's Must-Reads

There are one million new books published each year.  With so many books and so little time, where do you begin to find your next must-read? There’s the New York Times Bestseller list, the Goodreads app, the Cape Library’s Staff picks shelf and now Martin’s Must-Reads.

Every Wednesday at 6:42 and 8:42 a.m., and now Sunday at 8:18 a.m., Betty Martin recommends a must read based on her own personal biases for historical fiction, quirky characters and overall well-turned phrases. Her list includes WWII novels, biographies of trailblazers, novels with truly unique individuals and lots more. Reading close to 100 titles a year, Betty has plenty of titles to share. Tune in each Wednesday and visit KRCU.org for previous must-reads. 

“On 24 December 1617, just off the coast of the island of Vardo, Norway’s north-easternmost point, a storm lifted so suddenly eyewitnesses said it was as if it were conjured. In a matter of minutes, forty men were drowned.”

The days between election day and the presidential inauguration are normally quiet and uneventful.  The four months between the election of 1860 and inauguration day in 1861 were anything but quiet as they were filled with events that would change the course of the entire country.

A New York Times article about Nazis looting books during World War II and the fact that German libraries are still full of those stolen books was the catalyst for Kristin Harmel’s newest novel.

"My mom explained that everyone makes mistakes and that we have to learn to forgive our friends.  So that’s exactly what I did…I went to school the next day and told my friend that I forgave her. She said she was sorry and we hugged and made up.  Years later, I came to learn that was, in fact, not forgiveness.”

“A  woman sits on the ground, leaning against a pine. It’s bark presses hard against her back, as hard as life. It’s needles scent the air and a force hums in the heart of the wood. Her ears tune down to the lowest frequencies. The tree is saying things, in words before words.”

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