Consumer Handbook

Every week, join Whitney Quick as she helps you navigate life as a smart consumer. You'll cover everything in avoiding the latest scams, including phishing emails, medical equipment fraud, understanding layaway, hiring a reputable tax preparer, and even digital spring cleaning. 

Add to your toolbox and flip through your Consumer Handbook Thursdays during NPR’s Morning Edition at 6:42 a.m. and 8:42 a.m., only on KRCU. 

BBB Institute for Marketplace Trust

"Online Scams Rise During COVID-19 Pandemic: 2020 BBB Scam Tracker Risk Report" focuses on the impact of scams in the wake of the pandemic and the demographic groups most at risk.

Stock Catalog/Flickr

Between the winter weather and COVID-19, most people are spending a lot of time at home. Streaming services, such as Netflix or Hulu, are more popular than ever. Watch out for scams cashing in on this opportunity; BBB Scam Tracker has gotten numerous reports of a text message con tricking would-be watchers with “free” Netflix for a year. 

Flickr/Mary Cullen, instructionalsolutions.com

The manager for a large commercial builder recently called her IT support with serious concerns. One of their clients received an email that at first looked like it came from her work email account, asking for payment on completed work, but it didn’t originate from her office. The email address included her name, and the business domain was only one letter off. The sender asked for a wire transfer of payment for labor and materials on a large project costing almost a million dollars, and the recipient almost paid.

David Stewart/https://homegets.com/, License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode

Social media giveaways are a great way to promote your business. With the average adult in the United States spending more than two hours a day scrolling through social media, a well-run giveaway will help build brand awareness and grow your online following. 

Better Business Bureau

The United States' tax season is here, and so are the scammers. Con artists use the Social Security numbers of unsuspecting Americans to file phony tax returns and steal refunds. 

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