Almost Yesterday

Almost Yesterday is a glimpse into the rich history of our region. Dr. Frank Nickell takes listeners on a journey to specific moments in time, such as the first radio broadcast on KFVS, the history of Farmington’s Carleton College, and the short-lived safari on a Mississippi River island. A gifted storyteller and local historian, Dr. Nickell’s wit and love for the past are combined with sounds and music that augment his narrative.

On Saturday, June 7, 2008, Almost Yesterday received First Place in the "Special Programs" category at the Missouri Broadcasters Association Awards Banquet in Kansas City, Missouri.

Almost Yesterday airs every Wednesday at 5:42 and 7:42 a.m. and 5:18 p.m.

Local support for Almost Yesterday is provided by Ted Yates, Attorney Law.  In Cape Girardeau and online at semolaw.com.

Ways to Connect

August 29, 1960
Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that residents in the northern area of Cape Girardeau County established a new school which would bring together the students from six one-room country schools in the area. The country schools were crowded and located in wood-frame buildings that dated back to the 1800’s.

KFVS-12 beginnings were humble - Oscar W. Hirsch's living room, the location of KFVS Radio's first broadcast.
Southeast Missouri State University

It was more than 90 years ago but it seems like Almost Yesterday that KFVS Radio first went on the air.

Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that Walter W. Parker retired as president of Southeast Missouri State College.  The date was July 1, 1956, and his 23 year tenure as president of the institution is the longest in its history.

Shoe Factory September 9, 1907
Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that the Roberts, Johnson and Rand Shoe Company of St. Louis opened a manufacturing plant in Cape Girardeau. The date was September 9, 1907 and this proved to be a significant development in the economic growth of the city.

The five-story hotel stood in Cairo, Illinois's downtown district for 85 years before it was consumed by flames in 1943.
Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that the historic Halliday Hotel in Cairo, Ill., was destroyed by fire. The most famous structure in the history of Cairo was consumed by flames on the morning of Feb. 22, 1943. Within four hours, the majestic five-story, 155-room hotel was reduced to rubble.

Pages