Almost Yesterday

Almost Yesterday is a glimpse into the rich history of our region. Dr. Frank Nickell takes listeners on a journey to specific moments in time, such as the first radio broadcast on KFVS, the history of Farmington’s CarlstonCollege, and the short-lived safari on a Mississippi River island. A gifted storyteller and local historian, Dr. Nickell’s wit and love for the past are combined with sounds and music that augment his narrative.

Christine Brewer of Grand Tower, Illinois
Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that Ms. Christine Brewer appeared on the stage of Shryock Auditorium in Carbondale as a featured artist in the Southern Illinois Music Festival of 2008. For Ms. Brewer this was very much a homecoming.

It seems like Almost Yesterday that Dr. Lee Turley was delivering babies and providing medical care to the residents of St. Francois County Missouri.

For over 45 years, from 1890 to 1935, Dr. Turley became one of those legendary family doctors who became both physician and friend to three generations – and hundreds of families.

It seems like Almost Yesterday that Miss Eliza Ann Carleton began a log cabin college north of Farmington, Missouri. Her goal was to establish a college of high quality for the young people of the region.

Born and raised in a prominent Virginia family, Miss Carleton moved to Missouri in 1843 at age 17 to be close to her uncle Henry Carleton. Her family had provided her with an excellent education, and she had visited some of the most famous college of her native state.

 A powerful tornado killed 21 people in Cape Girardeau, Missouri on May 21, 1949.
Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like almost yesterday when a powerful tornado roared through the center of Cape Girardeau, Missouri. The deadly storm smashed into the city at approximately 7 p.m.,  Saturday, May 21, 1949.

The twister came in from the southwest along Gordonville Road and moved east across Highway 61. It demolished the Airline Restaurant and Lounge, swept across to the intersection of Broadway and Clark, and moved north of Broadway.

It seems like Almost Yesterday that the State of Missouri acquired a state flag. The date was March 22, 1913, and this was part of a movement motivated by the development of aluminum flag poles, the 1893 Columbian Exposition in Chicago, and the admission of three new states: Oklahoma, New Mexico and Arizona, all occurring in the early twentieth century. 

Only a few states had an official flag prior to 1900 but with the availability of sturdy aluminum flag poles, states could hoist their banners high -- in a period of great national pride and rapid growth.

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