Fresh Air

Weekdays 3 and 7 p.m.
  • Hosted by Terry Gross

An award-winning show and one of public radio's most iconic programs, Fresh Air is a weekday "talk show" that hardly fits the mold. Fresh Air Weekend collects the week's best cultural segments and crafts them together for great weekend listening. The show is produced by WHYY. Fresh Air opens the window on contemporary arts and issues with guests from worlds as diverse as literature and economics. Terry Gross is known for her extraordinary ability to engage guests of all dispositions.

Copyright 2021 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Copyright 2021 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

You fall in love with a person, but you get a package deal. That's one of the big messages of two new novels that ruminate on love and family, particularly the family that's thrust upon you when you happen to mate with one of their kith or kin.

The heroine of Katherine Heiny's buoyant new novel, Early Morning Riser, is a young second grade teacher named Jane who lives in Boyne City, Mich. On the very first page of the novel, Jane locks herself out of her house, calls a locksmith, and winds up spending the night and, eventually, her life with him.

On May 3, 1971, 20,000 demonstrators came to Washington, D.C., stopping traffic in the streets in a protest against the war in Vietnam.

On that same day nearly 50 years ago, NPR, then a fledgling news organization, premiered a new afternoon show. In its first show, All Things Considered presented a 23-minute sound portrait of the day's protests and confrontations that was broadcast to stations across the country.

It's a strange thing to host a late show alone without a live audience. But when the pandemic hit last year, the host of The Late Show With Stephen Colbert had to adjust.

Initially Colbert taped his show from home, with his wife and sons as crew — an experience he describes as a kind of 19th century "cottage industry."

"Like, the kids are going to come and help Dad cut the wood every day or something," he jokes. But he adds, it was also "intimate and wonderful and something I would never experience in another way."

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