Tom Harte

Host - Caffé Concerto

Tom Harte is a retired faculty member from Southeast Missouri State University where he was an award-winning teacher, a nationally recognized debate coach, and chair of the department of Speech Communication and Theatre.

A founder of “My Daddy’s Cheesecake,” a bakery/café in Cape Girardeau, a  food columnist for The Southeast Missourian, and a cookbook author, he blends his passion for food with his passion for classical music in his daily program, The Caffe Concerto.

An inveterate traveler as well as a connoisseur of food and classical music, Tom has been to the five major continents and sailed the seven seas in search of great music and great cuisine, delicacies which he enjoys most when consumed simultaneously.  He also hosts A Harte Appetite.

Ways to Connect

flickr user Rool Paap (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

Ready for a fish story? While cruising through Alaska's Inside Passage, I visited a salmon hatchery in Ketchikan - the salmon capital of the world - and renewed my respect for these persistent and tasty creatures. 

flickr user Mike Mozart (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

“Buy me some peanuts and Cracker Jack” is undoubtedly the most famous line from the ditty, "Take Me Out to the Ball Game."  To the makers of Cracker Jack the line has certainly been the most valuable.  Someone once tried to figure out the worth of the musical plug by comparing it to the cost of buying advertising on the outfield walls of every major league stadium and concluded that such a campaign would cost roughly $25 million a year.  “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” furnishes Cracker Jack the equivalent every year for free, making the song the greatest product placement scheme in the hist

A Harte Appetite: Soups

Oct 14, 2019
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

An old Spanish proverb says "Of soup and love, the first is best." It's an obvious overstatement, but it is true that soup can be alluring. And few things make a meal more elegant than a soup course -- especially if the soup is served in style! Say in a crystal or silver cup, a hollowed out squash (or other vegetable), or a bowl-shaped loaf of bread.

I won't soon forget the cream-of-cilantro soup I had at a Mexican restaurant in San Francisco a few years ago. It was served in a brilliant, blue bowl designed to set off the soup's beautiful green color.

flickr user U.S. Department of Agriculture (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

Long before it began asking, “Got Milk?” the Dairy Association used to tout milk as “Mother Nature’s most nearly perfect food.”  The slogan always made sense to me, especially those days when after I got home from school my mother would fix me a tall glass of chocolate milk.  Without the chocolate, milk was only nearly perfect.  With it, it could not be improved.

I was moved recently to think back on those memories and wonder, is chocolate milk really be just for kids?

I remember well the first time I went to Paris, more than 30 years ago. What impressed me most was not the Eiffel Tower or the Louvre. No, it was the bread. Crusty, chewy and full of flavor, there was simply nothing like it available at home at the time.

Pages