Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs

Host, To Your Health

Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs is an instructor and the director of health communication for Southeast Missouri State University’s Department of Communication Studies and Modern Languages. She writes for special publications of The Southeast Missourian and is a certified Community Health Worker. 

Ways to Connect

Can you believe we’re still discovering what’s going on inside our heads?

The glymphatic system is a recently discovered macroscopic waste clearance system in the brain. According to the authors of an article in Neurochemical Research, the glymphatic system functions mainly during sleep and is largely disengaged during wakefulness. The biological need for sleep across all species may, therefore, reflect that the brain must enter a state of activity that enables the elimination of potentially neurotoxic waste products.

The Encyclopedia of Global Health states, “While it is impossible to avoid all illnesses, there are many forms of preventive care that reduce health risks by improving individual health.”

What preventive care do you need to have this year? It depends on your age as well as your risk factors.

Madison Inouye

Author Brianna Weist recently wrote, “True self-care is not salt baths and chocolate cake, it is making the choice to build a life you don’t need to regularly escape from.”

Self-care CAN be salt baths and chocolate cake, but it is not just the now oft-touted reason for indulging yourself. True self-care involves some components that are not necessarily hedonistic.

flickr user Alisha Vollkommer https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

At Christmastime, Jack Frost nipping at your nose sounds cute. When you are shoveling snow in January, you worry about meeting his ugly cousin, frostbite.

While hypothermia, the lowering of core body temperature, is deadly, frostbite---freezing of the skin and underlying tissues--- can cause permanent tissue damage,  as well as lead to amputation and disability. The Mayo Clinic reports there are three stages of frostbite.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/ztec/8434316756/in/photolist-dRj5wq-5Pdxse-2mBRwd-VYRo5X-Xg61Ae-WFa4q3-WH97R1-6F5CH7-deVudw-4g5ZE1-b2hXCi-favicA-a8p3S6-2DEUQ-a9MmXR-aEjZC-85gtD5-ajypVf-9Hkcfk-57n7Av-8LnRm6-6hvwmD-WK6EHw-4eyVcA-9HkcLP-giHxV-bvtDzM-7j9UEA-eyJ / Loïc

Watching the ball drop in Times Square, singing “Old Lang Syne” and toasting with champagne are traditional ways of celebrating the new year. However, for some, the holiday provides what seems like a socially acceptable reason to overindulge in alcohol.

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