Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk. In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent, and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress, and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Journalism Award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

House Democrats defended their impeachment inquiry into President Trump on Wednesday, while opening another front in the ongoing battle with the White House over documents they are seeking for their probe.

Three House committee chairmen threatened to issue a subpoena for the documents.

"We're not fooling around here," House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff said at a news conference with fellow California Democrat House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

A government whistleblower received information from "multiple" officials that President Trump "is using the power of his office to solicit interference from a foreign country in the 2020 U.S. election."

An unclassified version of the whistleblower's complaint, made public Thursday by the House intelligence committee, says that the president's lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, "is a central figure in this effort. Attorney General [William] Barr appears to be as well."

Washington has been brought to the brink of impeaching the president based on a complaint from an anonymous whistleblower.

Whistleblowing dates back to the nation's earliest days and, since then, it has been a risky and controversial exercise.

Updated at 7:20 p.m. ET

President Trump blamed "a political hack job" for reports that a whistleblower has charged he had an improper conversation with a foreign leader.

The Washington Post on Friday reported that the conversation in question involves Ukraine.

Updated at 6:25 p.m. ET

House intelligence committee Chairman Adam Schiff vowed Thursday he is willing to sue the Trump administration over a dispute about the content of an as-yet-unknown complaint to the intelligence community's official watchdog.

Schiff told reporters after a closed-door meeting with the inspector general, Michael Atkinson, that the Justice Department has opined that the material is shielded by privilege and can be withheld from lawmakers.

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