Agriculture

Agriculture

MO HB 652 Aims To Expand WIC Vouchers To Farmers Market Nutrition Program

Feb 5, 2021
mswine/flickr.com/photos/melaniewong/2721673428/in/photolist-6Eodzh-59vhFW/creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/legalcode

Fresh produce from farmers markets might become more accessible for women, infants and children in low-income families in Missouri as Rep. Martha Stevens introduced House Bill 652 to expand WIC vouchers to be used in the Farmers Market Nutrition Program.

In the Feb. 4 morning hearing, representatives from the Rural Community Committee scrutinized how the bill plans to encourage participation.

In similar food insecurity programs, the Missouri Department of Agriculture saw staggered levels of participation from county to county because of administrative costs.

The Missouri Department of Conservation is reporting a huge increase in usage of the state’s parks and recreation areas in 2020.

Mostly due to the coronavirus pandemic’s restrictions encouraging people to spend more time outdoors, the more than 1,000 conservation areas saw much larger than usual crowds.

The framework for Missouri’s first black bear hunting season has received approval from the Missouri Conservation Commission.

The framework limits any future bear hunting to areas of southern Missouri and restricts bear hunting to Missouri residents only, according to MDC.

MDC will present recommendations to the commission next spring for a potential initial permit and harvest quota.  If those are approved, Missouri residents will be able to apply next May for an October 2021 fall hunt.

MDC says the hunt will be “limited and highly restrictive.”

A federal lawsuit filed Wednesday on behalf of the National Black Farmers Association in the Eastern District of Missouri is calling for the removal of Monsanto’s popular weedkiller Roundup from the market.

German biotech giant Bayer AG, which bought Monsanto two years ago, said in a statement that the new lawsuit has no basis and that its products are safe.

Growing up in southern Indiana, Karen Pepmeier and her friends would comb the farm fields during harvest season, gathering leftover ears of corn to raise money for their youth group.

“You hate to see it lay in the field and rot,” Pepmeier said. “If you grow up in one of these areas, you're very familiar with the waste that occurs there.”

Pages