To Your Health

With some questionable health advice being posted by your friends on Facebook, politicians arguing about the state of the American healthcare system and a new medical study being summarized in just a sentence or two on TV---that seems to contradict the study you heard summarized  yesterday---it can be overwhelming to navigate the ever changing landscape of health news.

Every Thursday at 7:42 a.m. and 5:18 p.m., Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs provides health information you can trust. With trustworthy sources, she explores the fact and fiction surrounding various medical conditions and treatments, makes you aware of upcoming screenings, gives you prevention strategies and more…all to your health.
 

You know it’s a bad habit. And yet, there you are stuck in traffic and you find yourself trimming your fingernails…with your teeth.

Up to 50 percent of us will chronically gnaw our nails at some point in our life, according to a study from the University of Calgary. But, nail biting is more than unattractive. It can carry health risks too.

The Mayo Clinic reports that nail biting can:

flickr user Chris Yarzab (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

What if when we talked about kids going “back to school” we considered their actual backs and their spinal health?

flickr user Lisa Norwood (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

Lon Hodge, a Vietnam veteran with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder once said: “People tell me, you don’t look like you need a service dog. And I say, that’s because I have a service dog.”

Runners sometimes joke about the strangest places they have gotten a drink when putting in long, hot miles ---from a stranger’s garden hose, a spigot on a golf course---but dehydration is no laughing matter. It’s also not something to cry about...because people who are dehydrated can’t produce tears.

flickr user Esther Vargas (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/)

Do Johns Hopkins Cancer Center and the Mayo Clinic sound like reliable sources to you? They do to the folks who write fake health news too.

Both Johns Hopkins and the Mayo Clinic keep their media departments hopping, issuing press releases to disprove the stories they have been mentioned in. Last week on “To Your Health” I explained how prevalent fake health news has become and how dangerous it can be. This week, we will look at how to avoid it.

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