Politics

Political news

Lawyers Want One Of Their Own On Missouri Supreme Court

Oct 11, 2012
A total of 18 candidates interviewed to take over the seat of now-retired Missouri Supreme Court Judge William Ray Price Jr. Judge Price held the seat for more than 20 years, until he retired in August.
Missouri Judicial Branch / MO Gov

A  St. Louis attorney says a judge should not be the one to fill a vacant seat on the Missouri Supreme Court.

St. Louis lawyer Benjamin Lipman was one of 18 candidates who interviewed to fill an open seat on the state's highest court.

Former Missouri Supreme Court Judge William Ray Price Jr. held the seat for more than 20 years, until he retired in August.

Price was the last supreme court judge who came directly from private practice, which Lipman says is an important background to have on the court.

Congressman Cleaver Opposes Voter IDs

Oct 10, 2012
Rep. Cleaver says some Missouri voters are confused on what identification they may now  need to vote. Many states now require to present a photo identification at the polls.
Redjar / Flickr

Congressman Emanuel Cleaver, who represents Missouri’s fifth district, says he’s worried voter ID laws in other states will suppress voting in Missouri.

Missouri voters don’t have to present a photo identification at the polls.  But Cleaver says all the discussion of voter ID laws around the country has confused some of his constituents.

He says they’ve been contacting his office to ask how to obtain an ID.

A handbill on an unoccupied truck.
paulswansen / Flickr

Last week, a federal judge temporarily blocked the city of Cape Girardeau from enforcing an ordinance that bans people from placing handbills on unoccupied cars. Now, judge John Ross is making that injunction permanent.

The decision comes after the Ku Klux Klan filed a lawsuit against the city, claiming the leafleting ban infringes free speech rights. 

Tony Rothert is the legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Eastern Missouri, who represented the KKK. He says it’s a victory for free speech.

Google made cost-cutting deals to place their Google Fiber service in Kansas City. The Kansas City Star's Scott Canon reports the city made a similar deal with Time Warner and is negotiating one with AT&T.

Low water levels on the Mississippi River are forcing commodities off of barges and onto trucks and trains. And the Chicago Sun Times Kara Spak reports consumers will feel the pinch.

The Associated Press reports a federal judge will not issue a preliminary injunction to block enforcement of a Missouri law that makes it a misdemeanor crime to disturb worship services.

Pages