Alt.Latino

Fridays 8:30PM

Every week, Alt.Latino introduces listeners to new alternative Latin music, including diverse genres such as cumbia, Mexican garage rock, Panamanian rap, heavy metal mariachi and many more boundary-blurring sounds from around the world. In addition to music, Alt.Latino features interviews and insightful conversation about Latin events and culture.

Hosts Felix Contreras and Jasmine Garsd's discussion of music and culture reflects their experiences as Latino immigrants (third and first generation, respectively), and is informed by Felix's long career covering Latin music and culture for NPR, NBC and Univision. Alt.Latino listeners actively contribute to these conversations and share their thoughts on music, politics, literature and cultural identity via Facebook and Twitter.

Jasmine and Felix are also frequently heard on NPR's news programs, where they speak to millions of listeners about the latest in Latin alternative music and the experiences of Latinos in the United States and abroad vis-á-vis music.

Ways to Connect

Listening to "Estaré Alegre, No Estaré Triste" from Meridian Brothers' upcoming album ¿Dónde estás María? transported me to the sonic equivalent of a Baroque church in the Americas — structures that, despite belying their colonial origins in over-the-top gold ornateness, remain deeply informed by an indigenous and criollo sensibility.

Several years ago, Julián Salazar — at the time guitar player for internationally-renowned band Bomba Estereo — spent some time on the Pacific coast of Columbia, an experience that motivated him to capture the lush, entrancing sonic landscapes of the jungle in his compositions.

Latin Roots: Balún

Aug 28, 2017

Our Latin Roots series continues with this mini-concert by Balún. The band's style is so textured and musically diverse that it had to come up with its own genre to describe its sound; the members call it "dreambow." It's where shoegaze-pop meets pan-Caribbean identity, with elements of Puerto Rican music and references to the Jamaican dancehall roots of reggaeton.

This is an Encore presentation of Alt.Latino.

Even better the second time!

Enjoy.

This week on Alt.Latino, we venture into a long-running conversation about remixing classic recordings. Along the way, we feature a new album released by Fania Records called Calentura, in which the label sent a handful of DJs and producers a treasure trove of original masters from the Golden Age of the brash and innovative Afro-Caribbean music known as salsa.

I can already hear some of you reacting to the concept:

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