1A

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  • Hosted by Joshua Johnson

1A aspires to be the most important daily conversation about the issues of our time. The show takes a deep and unflinching look at America, bringing context and insight to stories unfolding across the country and the world. 1A explores important issues such as policy, politics, and technology, while also delving into lighter subjects such as pop culture, sports and humor.

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Identity Politics Unmasked

Sep 18, 2018

Political scientist Francis Fukuyama thinks identity politics is a disease. The cure? It can come from the country.

Left-wingers may deride national identities and far right-wingers twist them to racist ends, but he argues there is hope for unifying people and giving them a broad sense of purpose. Francis Fukuyama is in favor of national identities based on creed, like the American one, rather than identities based on race or heritage. He is keen on national service and suspicious of dual citizenship.

Judge Brett Kavanaugh will testify again on Monday in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee after a California professor claimed he sexually assaulted her when they were in high school. The professor, Christine Blasey Ford, will also testify.

From The New York Times:

The romance novel industry is worth over a billion dollars.

Surprised? You really shouldn’t be.

In 2015, 75 million Americans said they had read a romance novel in the past year. The books fly off the shelves, and readers are constantly asking writers for more stories, even as many authors turn out novels at a rate of two per year.

The industry centers around women — in readership and in authorship — and stigma and shaming of romance fans persists.

Almost 20 years ago, a mentally ill man named Andrew Goldstein pushed Kendra Webdale into an oncoming train in New York City. She was killed instantly and Goldstein, who’d suffered from schizophrenia since childhood, was sent to prison.

The crime caught national attention, reinvigorating a debate about the care of people with severe mental illnesses.

In 1964, country musician Roger Miller had a big hit on his hands with “King of the Road.”

But there’s more to him than that.

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