Frank Nickell

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Frank Nickell is a history professor at Southeast Missouri  State University. 

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Walter W. Parker

Jun 5, 2018
Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that Walter W. Parker retired as president of Southeast Missouri State College.  The date was July 1, 1956, and his 23 year tenure as president of the institution is the longest in its history.

President Parker assumed the presidency of the small teacher’s college in July of 1933.  Born in rural Howard County, Arkansas on January 17, 1889, Parker graduated from Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas with a degree in English, and began his career in education at Central Missouri State College as a young professor of English.

The Hill-Burton Act

May 29, 2018
Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that Congress passed the “Hospital Survey and Construction Act” which became Public Law 725. This act provided funds to hospitals, nursing homes, and chronic care facilities, which had declined during the Great Depression and World War II.

By 1945 and the end of World War II, many American hospitals were obsolete – and approximately 50% of the nation’s counties had no hospital facilities at all.

Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that hundreds of comic books and magazines, judged as indecent and unfit for children, were ceremonially burned in Cape Girardeau.  The date was February 24, 1949, and the location was St. Mary’s High School on the corner of Sprigg and William Streets.

This large burning was one of many that emerged across the nation in 1948-49, seeking to eliminate the perceived dangers of the “new” graphic comic books.  In the Depression years of the 1930’s, comic books gained widespread popularity, and began to attract criticism for the vivid use of violence.

Almost Yesterday
Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that the legendary origin of the four rivers of St. Francois County was recorded by the writer and historian Allan Hinchey.

The four rivers – the Whitewater, Castor, Saline, and Little St. Francois – emerge close together, northeast of Fredericktown, Missouri, near the junction of Perry, Bollinger, Ste. Genevieve, Madison, and St. Francois Counties. Although they emerge close together, the four rivers flow in different directions.

Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that the transcontinental railroad was completed at Promontory Point in Utah. The year was 1869. Within a few months, Hiram Morgan Hill and his sister Sarah Althea Hill were on the new “Pacific Train” heading to California in search of fame and fortune.

At the time, “Morgan” Hill was 22 years of age; Sarah was 20. They were the orphaned children of Samuel Allen Hill, an attorney and Missouri legislator, and Julia Sloan, daughter of Hiram Sloan, who had operated a mill on Sloan’s Creek at the northern edge of Cape Girardeau.

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